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The Inmate programming team leaders have interfaced with all of the team leaders offering their full support in coordinating inmate requests to participate in the programming services.  Over 265 volunteers have donated over 3,700 of their time to these programs.  Truly these programs are a community effort to bring about change in our neighborhoods.

The Lake County Sheriff’s Department, Division of Corrections currently offers one of the most extensive inmate programming curriculums found in Ohio’s County Jails, supported by a wide use of volunteers throughout the area.  

Why is such programming critical to Lake County?   A quick look at inmate demographics nationwide illustrates the problems we are faced with.

  • There are 2.3 million people incarcerated in our prisons and jails today in the United States, as well as an additional 6 million persons on Probation and Parole.  Totaled, that is more people then in college or above in the United States.
  • There are 33% more mentally ill people in our jails and prisons today then there are in our mental hospitals.  Further, 16% of people incarcerated in jail today have mental conditions
  • 50-55% of all inmates in our jail and prisons have drug or alcohol addictions related to their crimes
  • 9% of inmates nationwide were homeless in the last 12 months prior to their arrest
  • Nearly 50% of those incarcerated nationwide cannot read or write
  • Over 60% of inmates were unemployed nationwide at the time of their arrest
  • This year over 700,000 people will be released from our nations jails and prisons … less then 10% will receive any type of treatment for their lack of education, mental health issues, and drug/alcohol addictions. 

Pew Study

More than One in 100 Adults Are Behind Bars, Pew Study Finds

Pew Contact: Jessica Riordan, 215.575.4886

If we fail to address the major issues of drug/alcohol abuse, mental health, lack of education and homelessness  we will be releasing back into our neighborhoods the same people who came to jail, with the same problems, only with increased problems associated with incarceration.  

It is the philosophy of the Lake County Adult Detention Facilities to return inmates back to society better then when they first came to us.  If we can help send inmates back home who are able to deal with their mental issues, who can stay off of drugs and alcohol, and who can obtain a GED so they can get better jobs, then we will be able to make homes safer for their children; our neighborhoods safer for the entire community; and reduce the burden of financial assistance for local government.

Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous is a voluntary, worldwide fellowship of men and women from all walks of life who meet together to attain and maintain sobriety. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking.  It is estimated that there are more than 114,000 groups and over 2,000,000 members in 180 countries.  A.A. is a program of total abstinence. Members simply stay away from one drink, one day at a time. Sobriety is maintained through sharing experience, strength and hope at group meetings and through the suggested Twelve Steps for recovery from alcoholism.  Anyone may attend open meetings of A.A. These usually consist of talks by a leader and two or three speakers who share experience as it relates to their alcoholism and their recovery in A.A. Some meetings are held for the specific purpose of informing the nonalcoholic public about A.A. Doctors, members of the clergy, and public officials are invited. Closed discussion meetings are for alcoholics only.

In May 2014 the average number of inmates who attended AA meetings per week at the Lake County Jail are as follows:

  • Males – 23.7
  • Females – 37.2 

In May 2014 the average number of inmates who attended the “Special Recovery” meetings per week at the lake County Jail are as follows:

  • Males – 15.4

Narcotics Anonymous

Narcotics Anonymous 

Narcotics Anonymous sprang from the Alcoholics Anonymous Program of the late 1940s, with meetings first emerging in the Los Angeles area of California, USA, in the early Fifties. The NA program started as a small US movement that has grown into one of the world’s oldest and largest organizations of its type.  Narcotics Anonymous provides a recovery process and support network inextricably linked together. One of the keys to NA’s success is the therapeutic value of addicts working with other addicts. Members share their successes and challenges in overcoming active addiction and living drug-free productive lives through the application of the principles contained within the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of NA. These principles are the core of the Narcotics Anonymous recovery program.Principles incorporated within the steps include:  

  • admitting there is a problem; 
  • seeking help; 
  • engaging in a thorough self-examination; 
  • confidential self-disclosure; 
  • making amends for harm done; 
  • and helping other drug addicts who want to recover.

In May 2014 the average number of inmates who attended NA meetings per week at the Lake County Jail are as follows:

  • Males – 21.6
  • Females – 21.9

General Education Development

Inmate Programming

The Inmate programming team leaders have interfaced with all of the team leaders offering their full support in coordinating inmate requests to participate in the programming services.  Over 265 volunteers have donated over 3,700 of their time to these programs.  Truly these programs are a community effort to bring about change in our neighborhoods.

Inmate Programming

The Lake County Sheriff’s Department, Division of Corrections currently offers one of the most extensive inmate programming curriculums found in Ohio’s County Jails, supported by a wide use of volunteers throughout the area.