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Lake County, Ohio - Common Pleas Court General Division

N.E.O.C.A.P.1

    Welcome to Lake County, Ohio - General Division Courts N.E.O.C.A.P.

    NORTHEAST OHIO COMMUNITY ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM (N.E.O.C.A.P.)

    NorthEast Ohio Community Alternative Program (N.E.O.C.A.P.) is located at 411 Pine Avenue, S.E., Warren, Ohio 44483; telephone (330) 675-2669; Fax (330) 675-2670.  Its Executive Director is Jake E. Jones.  It serves the Common Pleas Courts of Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake, Portage, and Trumbull Counties.

    MISSION STATEMENT

    The facility will provide its residents opportunities for change. Programs, such as education, chemical dependency, and vocational development will be offered in a supervised environment. This will enable the offender to understand and accept community/social values as their own, with the expected results of successful reintegration into the community.

    INTRODUCTION

     

    Montgomery County and the city of Dayton established the first pilot residential program in 1978 called "MonDay," representing the two governmental entities. The MonDay residential program operated from a previously abandoned jail and was successful in diverting non-violent offenders from prison.

    This success encouraged the legislature to pass House Bill (HB) 1000 in 1981. This legislation and Ohio Revised Code Sections 2301.51 through 2301.56 established funding and operational guidelines for Community-Based Correctional Facilities. Funding for construction of CBCFs followed the next year.

     

     

    ADMINISTRATION

     

    Community-Based Correctional Facilities are an alternative to prison incarceration for low-level felons.  They are the last step in the continuum of increasing punishment before prison incarceration.  The facilities are minimum-security operations housing 50-200 offenders.  Each program is highly structured with assessment, treatment, and follow-up services to reduce criminal behavior by offenders.  Emphasis is on substance abuse treatment, employment, education, community service, and transitional services to the community.

    The purpose of a Community-Based Correctional Facility is to:

    Reduce state prison commitments

    Reduce the costs of incarceration in Ohio

    Provide maximum public safety

    Facilitate offender re-entry into the community

    Make efficient use of limited prison space for serious offenders.

    Community-Based Correctional Facilities have provided safe, secure and effective community based sanction for appropriate felony offenders in partnership with local criminal justice officials, community and state agencies since 1978.

    Community-Based Correctional Facilities continued to expand in FY2000.  Three (3) district Community-Based Correctional Facilities were opened in Seneca, Union and Wood Counties providing 180 additional beds servicing twenty-two counties.

    Eighteen (18) CBCFs provided services to 87 of 88 counties.  In FY2000, Ohio courts sentenced 4,448 offenders to CBCFs compared to 3,739 offenders sentenced in FY1999.  This is an increase of 709 offenders over the prior year.

    FUNDING

     

     

    SUMMARY OF FY-02 FUNDING

    Personnel

    $2,447,003

    General Operating Expenses

    $526,205

    Program Expenses

    $132,230

    TOTAL BUDGET

    $3,105,438

     

    FY-02 COST ANALYSIS

    Grant Allocation

    $3,105,438

    Other Funds - RSAT Grant

    $34,322

    Total Diversions

    299

    Total Man-days

    37,960

    Cost Per Diversion

    $10,386

    Cost Per Diem  

     $81.80

    Total Expenditures

    $3,105,438

    Daily Bed Occupancy Rate

    92%

    Number of Full/Part Time Staff Positions

    71

    Personnel Fringe Benefit 

    27%

    Health Insurance Costs

    $369,029

    Life Insurance Costs

    $4,715

    Cost Per Meal 

    $1.41

    Cost Per Drug Screen

    $1.08

    FY-02 STAFFING

     

     

     

    MALE

    FEMALE

    African-American

    11

    6

    White

    25

    23

    TOTALS

    African-American 17 (26%)  

     

    White 48 (74%)  

     

    Male 36 (55%)

     

    Female 29 (45%)

     


     

     

     

     

    SUMMARY OF FY-01 FUNDING

     

    FY-01 Operating Budget

     

     

    Personnel

     

     

     

    $2,220,296

    Supplies (includes food)

    $279,466

    Contractual Services

    $123,000

    Communications

    $35,000

    Transportation

    $50,950

    Printing 

    $8,000

    Utilities   

    $96,395

    Maintenance (Facility)

    $56,000

    Insurance

    $37,006

    Staff Training/Development

    $37,300

    Equipment

    $75,000

    TOTAL BUDGET

    $3,018,413

    FY-01 COST ANALYSIS

     

     

     

    $3,018,413

    Other Funds

    NONE

    Total Diversions

    286

    Total Man-days

    37,230

    Cost Per Diversion

    $10,553

    Cost Per Diem  

     $81.07

    Total Expenditures

    $3,018,413

    Daily Bed Occupancy Rate

    88%

    Personnel Fringe Benefit 

    33%

    Health Insurance Costs

    $289,467

    Life Insurance Costs

    $5,260

    Cost Per Meal 

    $1.15

    Cost Per Drug Screen

    $1.23

    FY-01 STAFFING

     

     

     

    MALE

    FEMALE

    African-American

    9

    4

    White

    29

    24

    TOTALS  

    African-American 13 (20%)  

     

    White 53 (80%)  

     

    Male 38 (58%)

     

    Female 28 (42%)


     

     

    IMPACT OF NEOCAP ON PRISON DIVERSIONS

    In FY-02, NEOCAP received 299 offenders into the program.  The cost to involve these residents in an intensive criminogenic treatment program was $3,105,438.  92% successfully completed the program and returned to their homes prepared to lead law-abiding and productive lives.  These individuals could have been sent to prison -- at a cost of incarceration of $6,619,860.  NEOCAP saved the taxpayers $3,514,422.

    In FY-01, the cost to incarcerate an offender in an Ohio prison is $22,146 per year.  An offender serving a sentence at NEOCAP costs $10,555.  In effect, the state saves approximately $11,500 for every offender who successfully completes the NEOCAP program.

    NEOCAP not only saves tax dollars, NEOCAP also gets better results.  Nearly 90% of those sentenced to NEOCAP successfully complete the program and since our inception in 1997, nearly 80% of those released have remained in the community.

    NEOCAP’s 23% recidivism rate represents a tremendous value for the public dollars invested in this program.  Thirty-two percent of those released from prison are re-incarcerated within three years.

    JUDICIAL CORRECTIONS BOARD

    2003

     

    Judge W. Wyatt McKay, Trumbull County Common Pleas Court, Chairman

    Judge Thomas A. Swift, Trumbull County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Martin O. Parks, Lake County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Richard L. Collins, Jr., Lake County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Forrest W. Burt, Geauga County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Joseph R. Kainrad, Portage County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Ronald W. Vettel, Ashtabula County Common Pleas Court

    2004

    Judge W. Wyatt McKay, Trumbull County Common Pleas Court, Chairman

    Judge Thomas A. Swift, Trumbull County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Paul H. Mitrovich, Lake County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Richard L. Collins, Jr., Lake County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Forrest W. Burt, Geauga County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Joseph R. Kainrad, Portage County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Ronald W. Vettel, Ashtabula County Common Pleas Court

    2005

    Judge W. Wyatt McKay, Trumbull County Common Pleas Court, Chairman

    Judge Thomas A. Swift, Trumbull County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Paul H. Mitrovich, Lake County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Eugene A. Lucci, Lake County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Forrest W. Burt, Geauga County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Joseph R. Pittman, Portage County Common Pleas Court

    Judge Ronald W. Vettel, Ashtabula County Common Pleas Court

    CITIZEN’S ADVISORY BOARD

    The Judicial Corrections Board appointed a Citizens Advisory Board in 1995.  Members of this board have played a significant role, both collectively and individually, in NEOCAP’s development.  At various times, each board member has been called upon to help with specific issues germane to their areas of expertise.  Their value is immeasurable to our success.

     

    Reverend Edgar Fisher Jr., Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, Warren, Ohio

    John R. Gargano, Esq., Attorney at Law, Warren, Ohio

    Dennis R. Griffith, President of Trumbull Business College, Warren Ohio

    Kathleen Kinney, Executive Director of Lake Area Recovery Center, Ashtabula, Ohio

    Attorney James F. Lewis, Esq., Director of Ohio Public Defenders Office, Trumbull County

    Vincent E. Peterson, Officer in Charge of ISP for Trumbull County Adult Probation Department

    Barry L. Spring, Chief Probation Officer of Lake County Adult Probation Department

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

    WHAT IS NEOCAP?

     

    NEOCAP is a five county community-based corrections facility (CBCF).  It is located in Warren, Ohio and opened in October of 1997.  It serves as a sentencing option for the common pleas court in Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake, Portage, and Trumbull Counties.

    WHO RUNS NEOCAP?

    NEOCAP is under the direct administration of a Judicial Corrections Board.  The Board hired an Executive Director who is responsible for all facets of the business and operations of the facility.  The Executive Director, Jim Corfman, reports to the Judicial Corrections Board, which meets regularly to approve budget, policies and procedures, and other matters regarding the operation of the facility.

    IS NEOCAP A GOVERNMENTAL FACILITY?

    Yes.  However, it is a non-traditional one.  The members of the staff of NEOCAP are direct employees of the Judicial Corrections Board, not state or county employees.  NEOCAP is set up as a Department in the Trumbull County Government structure in a cooperative venture.  The Trumbull County Auditor acts as NEOCAP’s fiscal agent and the Trumbull County Commissioners provide support.

    HOW ELSE IS NEOCAP’s STRUCTURE UNIQUE?

    Besides being a regional facility, a quasi-Trumbull County Department, and a corrections facility operated by judges, NEOCAP is also a partner with the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation & Corrections (DR&C).  The DR&C audits our programs annually to assure that we comply with established operating standards.

    HOW IS NEOCAP FUNDED?

    The Judicial Corrections Board establishes the budget, and it is submitted to the Department of Rehabilitation & Corrections for funding.   The Bureau of Community Sanctions (a part of DR&C) administers funding which is provided from General Revenue Funds of the state of Ohio.

    For more information, visit the N.E.O.C.A.P. web site at http://www.neocapcbcf.co.trumbull.oh.us.

     

    Gender & Race of Staff 

     

    Grant Allocation

     

    In FY-01, NEOCAP’s operating budget was $3,018,413.  Beginning in July 2000, NEOCAP's capacity increased from 66 to 86 male beds and 30 beds for female offenders were added.

     

    Gender & Race of Staff 

     

    In FY-02, NEOCAP’s operating budget was $3,105,438.  NEOCAP's capacity is 25 female and 91 male residents.

     

    One hundred per cent of NEOCAP’s operating budget comes from the Ohio General Assembly’s General Revenue Funds.  The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections allocates funding based on a budget developed by the Judicial Corrections Board.  The NEOCAP fiscal year runs from July 1 through June 30 of the next year.  Fiscal year 2002 (FY-02) ended on June 30, 2002.

     

    Ohio’s Community-Based Correctional Facilities are a unique partnership between state and local governments.  The state benefits by having community corrections options in the counties for non-violent felony offenders.  This saves costly prison bed space for more violent offenders.  The county benefits by having a residential sentencing option that is controlled locally.

     

     

    Community-Based Correctional Facilities (CBCFs) developed in Ohio in the late 1970's as a response to prison overcrowding. The Ohio General Assembly passed legislation to grant funds to counties for probation projects. The "Pilot Probation" projects were designed to sanction offenders locally rather than committing them to prison.

     

    The mission of the facility is to provide a viable sentencing alternative to the common pleas courts of the five member counties of the NorthEast Ohio Community Alternative Program. The program will operate a highly structured, treatment oriented, and secure community-based corrections facility, to insure the safety and security of the member communities.